The Lockdown Tracks

When the Covid 19 crisis hit, and U3A groups were prevented from meeting, eight members of the Street and Glastonbury "Music Jamming" group decided to continue to meet using video conferencing.

We realised that it was not technically feasible to play music together this way because of time lags that occur when using broadband networks.

However, we decided to keep in touch using the technology. Soon the notion emerged that we could at least exchange songs or tunes in the form of a computer file and play along with these to keep up with a limited form of practice.

This soon developed to the notion that by playing along with a backing track individuals could record their contribution in their own time, send the sound file to the master-mixer* who then merged all the files centrally, producing the final track.


From this emerged "How Jammy – The Lockdown Tracks". Several play-along-tracks were created from our existing portfolio, and members of the group contributed one or more tracks to the tunes selected.

We chose a mix of familiar and not so familiar pieces and hope that any listeners will appreciate them given the complexity, effort and time taken made by all involved in producing them. We are only a bunch of amateurs after all!

Songs:

1 Londonderry Air
2 Greensleeves
3 Kojo No Tsuki
4 Malaika
5 Scarborough Fair
6 Si Bheag Si Mhor
7 Planxty Fanny Power & Planxty Irwin
8 Creag Guanach (Mingulay Boat Song)

Scroll down to see the contributors and listen to the songs...

* Special thanks to Tony Martin for creating the backing tracks, and in mixing all contributions to produce the final tracks.




The S&G U3A Lockdown Band




Londonderry Air

The title of the air came from the name of County Londonderry, and was collected by Jane Ross of Limavady in the county.

The tune was adopted for the song "Danny Boy"


Press ► above to listen

Contributors:

Chorus (keyboard) ~ Wendy Howiantz

Violin & Flute (aerophone) ~ Tony Martin

Ukulele ~ Pat Mead

Ukulele ~ Andy Pickford


Greensleeves

A traditional English folk song. A broadside ballad by the name "A Newe Northen Dittye of ye Ladye Greene Sleves" was registered by Richard Jones at the London Stationer's Company in September 1580, and the tune is found in several late-16th-century and early-17th-century sources.


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Contributors:

Keyboard ~ Wendy Howiantz

Oboe & Strings (aerophone) ~ Tony Martin

Mandolin ~ Pat Mead

Melodica ~ Andy Pickford

Baritone Ukulele ~ Tony Martin


Kojo No Tsuki

"The Moon over the Ruined Castle" is a Japanese song.

Japanese pianist and composer Rentarō Taki composed the music as a music lesson song without instrumental accompaniment in 1901


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Contributors:

Keyboard ~ Wendy Howiantz

Flute (aerophone) ~ Tony Martin

Guitar ~ Tony Martin

Guitar ~ Pat Mead

Recorder ~ Pat Mead

Melodica & Accordian ~ Andy Pickford


Malaika

Malaika is a Swahili song written by Tanzanian musician Adam Salim in 1945.

This song is possibly the most famous of all Swahili love songs in Tanzania, Kenya and the entire East Africa.


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Contributors:

Vocals ~ Martha Jay

Guitar ~ Tony Martin

Bass Ukulele ~ Michael Turner-Welch

Ukulele ~ Pat Mead

Ukulele ~ Andy Pickford



Scarborough Fair

The song lists a number of impossible tasks given to a former lover who lives in Scarborough, North Yorkshire.

The melody is in Dorian mode and is very typical of the middle English period. It was recorded by a number of musicians in the twentieth century.


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Contributors:

Flute ~ Martha Jay

Violin & Choir (aerophone) ~ Tony Martin

Guitar, Ukulele & Mandolin ~ Pat Mead

Baritone Ukulele ~ Tony Martin

Melodica & Ukulele ~ Andy Pickford


Si Bheag Si Mhor

It is usually attributed to blind harpist and singer Turlough O'Carolan (1670-1738) as his first composition, which he wrote to the tune of "The Bonnie Cuckoo".


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Contributors:

Keyboard ~ Wendy Howiantz

Flute ~ Martha Jay

Guitar ~ Tony Martin

Ukulele ~ Pat Mead

Ukulele ~ Andy Pickford


Planxty Fanny Power
& Planxty Irwin

Two songs composed by Turlough O'Carolan,(1670 – 1738).
He was a blind Celtic harper, composer and singer in Ireland.
A "planxty" is a piece of music in free form usually written for someone,
eg "For Irwin"

Planxty Fanny Power

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Planxty Irwin

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Contributors:

Flute ~ Martha Langley

Ukulele, Aerophone, Guitar ~ Tony Martin

Concertina ~ Kate Stokes

Ukulele ~ Pat Mead

Accordian & Melodica ~ Andy Pickford


Creag Guanach

This is the tune for the Mingulay Boat Song.


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Contributors:

The Lockdown Band!